Holy shitballs! I just calculated my distance and I’ve walked 416 kms! The ~30kms I didn’t walk on day two is in this total, and I’m keeping them in to make up for all the times I’ve been lost. I’m in Baiona, Spain right now after a two hill day – the feet are barking. And just when I thought my blisters were but a few itchy spots, a few new ones made an appearance. I tend to get the blisters when wearing the thicker socks. I think my feet are walking too hot. So back to my thinner socks for the rest of my Camino.

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We’ve decided to take a rest day tomorrow, as Baiona is beautiful – our hotel is right on the ocean and just steps from a little beach. After we checked in today, we found the Tourist office and got our sellos (the Spanish word for Carimbo) – then a large dish of seafood paella and bottle of white wine. Like most European countries I’ve been to, the wines offered are local/regional, which helps make the decision less daunting.

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The highlight of the last few days was the 20 minute ferry across the Rio Minho from Caminha, Portugal to A Guarda, Spain. The second to last day we walked in Portugal, we came around a point and there it was in the distance – Mt. Tejo, Spain! I was teary-eyed, as it marks a significant point in my journey. This was the same day we walked about 3 km on the beach. Kara’s blisters were talking, so she stayed out of the surf, but I couldn’t resist – so off came the boots and socks and the cool Atlantic Ocean fed my feet for about an hour as I walked on a slight slant with my pack. A couple from Belgium stopped to chat and he was confused why we were choosing to walk on the difficult sand, vs the paved path. We tried our best to explain it was for the beauty of it all, but he just didn’t get it.

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Since Porto, the Camino has felt different from the first two weeks on my own. Obviously walking solo compared to walking with a buddy makes for a change (I like both variations), but there are more pilgrims and the areas seem to be more populated. So I’ve gone from birds and eucalyptus forests with hardly any human interaction to coastal winds, lots of people around and the constant crashing of waves on the shore.

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